Master Plans

Approved September 6, 1984 and amended November 7, 1985 and October 27, 1994


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Section 1 - Introduction

Section 2 - Use of Master Plan by the Commission and Other Agencies

Section 3 - Contents of Master Plan Submission

Section 4 - Form of Submission of Master Plan

Section 5 - Master Plan Coordination and Review Process


Section 6 - Time Period for Review

Section 7 - Presubmission Requirements


Section 8 - Amendments or Modifications to Master Plans


Section 9 - Review and Updating of Master Plans



Section 1 - Introduction

Section 5(a) of the National Capital Planning Act of 1952, as amended, (hereinafter "Planning Act"), provides that each Federal and District of Columbia agency prior to the preparation of construction plans originated by such agency for proposed developments and projects or to commitments for the acquisition of land, to be paid for in whole or in part from Federal or District funds, shall advise and consult with the National Capital Planning Commission (hereinafter "Commission") in the preparation by the agency of plans and programs in preliminary and successive stages which affect the Comprehensive Plan for the National Capital.

A master plan is an integrated series of documents which present in graphic, narrative, and tabular form the present composition of an installation and the plan for its orderly and comprehensive long-range development, generally over a period of 20 years. The Commission has determined that an approved master plan is a required preliminary stage of planning prior to agency preparation and submission to the Commission of site and building plans for individual projects. Master plans are necessary for installations on which more than one principal building, structure, or activity is located or is proposed to be located.

Ordinarily, the Commission will not approve, or recommend favorably on, project plans for an installation for which there is no approved master plan unless the agency provides an explanation satisfactory to the Commission as to the agency's reasons for not submitting a current master plan, or modification thereto, for the installation.

In accordance with Section 5(b) of the Planning Act, these requirements shall not apply to the Capitol Grounds or to the planning for structures within existing military, naval, or Air Force reservations erected by the Department of Defense during wartime or national emergency, except that the appropriate defense agency shall consult with the Commission as to any developments which materially affect traffic or require coordinated planning of the surrounding areas.

These requirements are intended to be used in connection with proposed developments of the Federal and District of Columbia Governments, including civilian and military installations within the National Capital Region1 (hereinafter "Region"), except as provided above. The Commission, as a policy, limits its review of District of Columbia plans to matters of Federal interests.

The Executive Director of the Commission may extend, modify, or waive any requirement pertaining to the scope and content of a master plan on sites where such requirements cannot be met because of the unique or special character or quality of the installation affected. Where such extension, modification, or waiver involves contents of the master plan that may reasonably be expected to address or involve potential significant off-site impacts, the Executive Director shall provide notice to potentially affected public agencies and, if appropriate, provide opportunity for consultation.

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Section 2 - Use of Master Plan by the Commission and Other Agencies

A master plan is used by the Commission as a basic guide in its review of and action on:
A. proposed land acquisitions, changes in land use, and/or preliminary and final site and building plans for individual construction and development projects on an installation within the region, pursuant to Section 5 of the Planning Act;
B. preliminary and final site and building plans for Federal public buildings on an installation within the District of Columbia and District of Columbia Government buildings on an installation within the central area2 of the District of Columbia (as concurrently defined by the Commission and the Council of the District of Columbia), pursuant to D.C. Code, 1981 edition, sec. 5432;
C. proposed dispositions of land pursuant to the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949;
D. annual capital budget proposals of Federal agencies, pursuant to Office of Management and Budget Circular A-ll; and
E. advance programs of capital improvements of Federal agencies, pursuant to Section 7(a) of the Planning Act, and multi-year capital improvements plans for the District of Columbia, pursuant to Section 7(b) of the Planning Act.
A master plan also serves as the basic planning document for intergovernmental coordination on developments and projects within an installation.

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Section 3 - Contents of Master Plan Submission

An installation master plan includes narrative materials and data, maps and drawings, and presentation materials which describe and illustrate existing conditions and proposed developments and changes in conditions on the installation.
Before preparing a submission, please review the Environmental and Historic Preservation Policies and Procedures. The recently adopted requirements for environmental and historic preservation compliance differ from those outlined in this document, which was last adopted by the Commission in 1994 and is now being updated. Please defer to the requirements outlined in the Environmental and Historic Preservation Policies and Procedures.

A. Narrative Materials and Data. (See Section 4 - Form of Submission of Master Plan for information on alternative methods of submitting required narrative materials and data.)

1. Master Plan Report

The master plan report shall include the following:

a. a description and analysis of existing conditions, including employee, visitor, and resident facilities and needs, with reference to the existing conditions map;

b. a description of the relationship of the proposed uses on the installation to the overall missions or responsibilities, functions, and facilities of the agency or agencies that are proposed to occupy the site;

c. a list of master planning objectives;

d. a description of the master plan proposals with reference to the master plan drawings;

e. a summary sheet for easy reference providing the following information for both existing conditions and long-range projections:

(1) total acreage, including a breakdown in acreage of land area by use (for example: office/administrative, training, service);
(2) total population, including a breakdown by employees and visitors (by shifts), residents, and students, noting peak arrival and departure times;
(3) building floor area;
(4) total number of parking spaces; and
(5) any other useful statistics and facts;

f. a description of the relationship of the proposed master plan to the Comprehensive Plan, in particular the Federal Facilities element's employee parking policies, and to the sponsoring agency's own agency-wide, long range plan and program for its installations within the Region, including the rationale for any aspect of the master plan not in conformance with the Comprehensive Plan;

g. a description of community participation efforts, including a description of the efforts of the sponsoring agency to coordinate with affected citizen groups in the vicinity of the installation, and a report of citizen views and comments on the submission;

h. a report on individuals, families, and business required to be relocated by the proposals, if any;

i. an analysis, pursuant to the implementation proposals of the Federal Employment element of the Comprehensive Plan, of the availability of affordable housing within reasonable commuting distances from the affected installation for employees and their families in cases in which the master plan proposes to change the location of, or add, 100 or more Federal employees;

j. the status of the sponsoring agency's coordination of its master planning with the local and state planning agencies and the Council of Governments, including reference to any existing agreements with such agencies;

k. a report on the consistency of the proposed master plan or revised master plan with applicable local, subregional, regional, and state development plans and policies, including a description of the rationale of the sponsoring agency in making its determination of consistency;

l. a historic preservation report which includes: an analysis of the effects, if any, that the master plan will have on recognized historic resources both on the installation or in the vicinity; and the status of compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended, if applicable (Compliance must be completed prior to Commission action.);

m. a description of the predominate design idea, or set of ideas, which (1) relate the urban design framework and land use proposals within the master plan and (2) will guide the general design, character, materials and other aspects of buildings, site improvements and landscaping on the installation in the future;

n. a Transportation Management Program (TMP) for installations with 100 or more employees (including existing and proposed employees). The TMP should incorporate the following:


(1) a description of existing and projected peak hour traffic by mode, with indicated points of entrance and exit, the number of existing and proposed bicycle spaces, as well as transit routes and stops and pedestrian facilities serving the installation, both on-site and in the nearby area; and a summary of existing and proposed parking by type of assignment (official cars, vanpools, carpools, single-occupant vehicles, handicapped persons, visitors, etc.);

(2) a description of the Federal agency's existing strategies for assisting employees' commute to work;

(3) stated goals and objectives for the TMP, such as trip reduction, mode split changes, or vehicle occupancy rate increases;

(4) an evaluation of projected transportation impacts resulting from master plan developments and description of potential TMP mitigation measures;

(5) a description of the process for monitoring and evaluating the achievement of goals and objectives and adjusting TMP strategies, as needed; and

(6) a summary of the relationship of the TMP provisions to transportation management and air quality requirements of local, state and regional agencies, including provisions for working cooperatively with affected agencies to address those requirements.

For installations where future site tenants are undetermined, TMP information should be developed to the extent feasible at the time of the initial preparation of the Master Plan, with supplementary information to be developed when tenants are established.

o. a description of proposed energy conservation strategies and policies related to the siting and design of new buildings, the retrofitting of existing structures, the use of transportation facilities, and the consumption of renewable energy resources for the purpose of complying with Federal energy efficiency objectives;

p. water quality management strategies and policies for controlling the impacts of any on-site discharges to natural drainage ways or to adjacent streams or wetlands and, in conjunction with the stormwater management plan required pursuant to Section 3.B.3.e. for controlling erosion and sedimentation and other non-point sources of pollution; and

q. a staging program reflecting the graphic staging plan required pursuant to Section 3.B.3.F., that indicates in narrative and/or tabular form the proposed sequence of development over the period covered by the master plan.
In cases in which information required in the Master Plan Report is fully provided in the required environmental documentation, it need not be repeated in the Master Plan Report.

2. Environmental Document

The environmental document prepared by the sponsoring agency pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended, and Council on Environmental Quality Regulations shall be a part of the master plan submission. The document shall be an environmental impact statement, if required pursuant to Section 102(2)(C) of NEPA. If an EIS is not required, an environmental assessment shall be submitted. The environmental document should be prepared in consultation with the Commission, pursuant to Section S.C. of these requirements and the Commission's Environmental Policies and Procedures.
 
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B. Maps and Drawings. (See Section 4 - Form of Submission of Master Plan for information on alternative methods of submitting required maps and drawings.)

1. Vicinity Map

The vicinity map shall show the location of the installation in relation to well-known features of the surrounding community within at least one mile from the installation, such as major transportation facilities, natural features, and public facilities. Existing land uses and zoning shall be shown on the map for the area surrounding the installation. Where adopted local and/or state plans propose changes in surrounding transportation facilities, land use, or zoning, the proposed changes shall be shown on the vicinity map. If the proposed changes cannot be clearly depicted on a vicinity map in combination with existing conditions, a separate vicinity map showing the installation in relation to planned surrounding conditions shall be provided.

2. Inventory Maps

The following inventory maps shall be prepared from a common base map which depicts existing physical conditions on the installation, with the coverage of the map extending beyond the boundaries of the installation in all directions for at least one city block in urban areas and 1/4 mile in suburban and rural areas:

a. Existing land use map. The existing land use map shall indicate by appropriate categories the allocation of land uses on the installation. This allocation should also be provided in tabular form on the existing land use map. (An itemized list of suggested land use categories is available from the Commission staff.)

b. Existing conditions map. The existing conditions map shall include the following:

  1. internal road system, entrance and exist locations, with existing peak hour traffic counts, the number of existing parking spaces for each site, building, and facility, and public transit routes and stops. (This information may be shown on a separate map entitled "Existing Circulation Map", if desired.);
     
  2. all existing buildings, structures, and other manmade improvements, indicating the use and height of principal buildings and structures;
     
  3. properties and districts listed in the National Register of Historic Places or on local historical registers;
     
  4. existing wooded areas, watercourses, ultimate 100 year flood plains, wetlands, and other significant natural areas and features;
     
  5. existing typography of the installation at a contour interval that clearly indicates the configuration of the land (generally at not less than five-foot intervals);
     
  6. major utilities; and
     
  7. if the installation is located within the State of Maryland, areas of critical concern to the State of Maryland as identified by the Maryland Department of State Planning, as well as officially designated coastal zone areas and "primary management areas" and "woodland buffers" along the Patuxent River within the region, as defined in the Patuxent River Policy Plan, Maryland Department of State Planning.
     
c. Existing Urban Design Framework Diagram. The existing urban design framework diagram shall include the following:
  1. significant natural and man-made features, such as distinctive building groupings or alignments, important formal or informal landscape compositions, special views and vistas, Special Streets, scenic routes, gateways or edges, etc., noting the role such elements serve in either unifying the installation, manifesting its overall form or precincts therein, or contributing to or reinforcing a larger urban design context such as the National Capital's urban design framework or other Federal interest; and
     
  2. intrusions, barriers, gaps or other disparate conditions affecting the integrity of the urban design qualities identified above;
3. Master Plan Proposals

The following maps illustrating the master plan proposals shall be prepared from a common base map which depicts future physical conditions to be achieved on the installation through the master plan, with the coverage of the map extending beyond the boundaries of the installation as required on the inventory base map;

a. Urban Design Framework Diagram. The urban design framework diagram should precede and be more diagrammatic than the maps listed below. The framework diagram shall graphically indicate the retention, enhancement or modification of the inventoried urban design features and the broad urban design principles and development controls which, together, serve to support and strengthen the intended form and character of the installation.

b. Land Use Plan. The land use plan shall indicate by appropriate categories the proposed general land use of all land within the installation.

c. Circulation Plan. The circulation plan shall indicate at least the following:
  1. the proposed internal road system of the installation incorporating existing-to-remain and proposed roads and showing the functional classification of all roads;

  2. existing-to-remain and proposed ingress and egress points serving the installation and their relationship to the existing, programmed, and planned roads immediately adjacent to the facility;

  3. existing-to-remain and proposed off-street parking facilities showing the number of existing or estimated parking spaces for each separate facility;
  4. the proposed pedestrian circulation system, incorporating existing features to remain;

  5. the proposed public transportation system showing the routes and stops serving the installation; and

  6. proposed bicycle paths, if any, incorporating existing features to remain.
d. Site Development Plan. The site development plan shall indicate the general location and use of all existing to-remain and proposed buildings and structures, the general order magnitude of building scale and orientation, and other site improvements such as landscaping. The site development plan shall be accompanied by two site development cross sections. These sections shall be cut through the center of the site at approximately 90 percent to each other to show the topography of the site, buildings, structures and landscape elements. On large installations with low intensity development, the cross sections may be limited to areas of major building concentrations.

e. Landscape Plan. Ideally, the landscape plan should be presented as a separate plan. It may be incorporated in the site development plan if the combined plan satisfies all content requirements and is clearly readable. The landscape plan is not intended to present precise landscaping proposals but rather to indicate the general landscaping concepts to be achieved in future projects. The landscape plan, shall indicate at least the following:
    wooded areas, including those to be retained and cleared, and, in urbanized sites, the general location of all existing trees one foot or more in diameter to be retained or removed;

    the general location and extent of all proposed landscaping within the installation; and

    existing-to-remain and proposed topography of the installation at a contour interval that clearly shows the relationship of the proposed changes to the existing topography.
f. Stormwater Management Plan. The stormwater management plan shall indicate the location and size of natural drainage ways, storm sewer line and outfalls, infiltration devices, retention and detention ponds, storm drainage outfalls, and any other mitigation measures to control storm water runoff on the installation, including measures required by state or local law, with back-up computations.

g. Staging Plan. The staging plan shall graphically illustrate the proposed sequence of development over the projected period covered by the master plan in five-year development stages. Projects to be developed in the initial five-year stage shall accord with the sponsoring agency's proposed capital improvements program submitted annually to the Commission under Section 7(a) of the Planning Act and described in the Commission's Federal Capital Improvements Program for the National Capital Region.

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C. Presentation Materials
1. Models. Models should be submitted with master plans for sites on which significant concentrations of new buildings programs are proposed to show the topography of the site and illustrate the site development, circulation, and landscape proposals. A joint determination will be made between the sponsoring agency and Commission staff regarding the need for a model. Where a model is needed, buildings may be shown in massing forms without depiction of architectural style or details. Models will be returned to the sponsoring agencies following action by the Commission.

2. Photographs. Sponsoring agencies shall submit photographs to aid in the review and evaluation of proposed master plans. Where possible, photographs shall include both direct overhead and oblique aerial views, eye level panoramic views, and views of special features of the installation.

TopSection 4 - Form of Submission of Master Plan

A. Map Scales
Maps should preferably be at a scale of 1:1000, or alternatively 1:2000 in the case of large installations that cannot be depicted on a single sheet at the larger scale. In the case of an unusually large Federal installation, sectionalized maps at either scale would be preferred together with an overall composite map of the entire installation at a scale appropriate to its size. Sponsoring agencies, in accordance with Executive Order 12770, "Metric Usage in Federal Government Programs", at the earliest feasible time, should submit their maps and drawings in metric units.

B. Presentation and record map sheet sizes.
Presentation and record maps should be at a standardized sheet size, whenever possible. Individual sheets should be a maximum of 34 by 44 inches, in order to be compatible with the Commission's microfilm program.

C. Reduced size maps.
The master plan maps shall also be reduced to page size for incorporation in the master plan submission. The reduced size maps may be incorporated in the Master Plan Report required in Section 3.A.l. If incorporated in the Master Plan Report, the reduced size maps may be of a size compatible with the format of the report selected by the sponsoring agency. If submitted separately from the Master Plan Report, the reduced size maps shall be of a page size no larger than 8-1/2" x 14".

D. Numbers of copies of maps and other documents.
The numbers of copies of maps and other documents to be submitted vary according to jurisdiction and the related referral requirements that must be met by the Commission. (See Sections 5.F. and 8.). Copies of full size maps and other required master plan documents shall be submitted according to the following schedule:

Jurisdiction

 Number of Sets

For installations within the District of Columbia requiring regional review 13 complete sets of maps and supporting documents 
For installations in Maryland requiring regional review 16 complete sets of maps and supporting documents
For installations in Virginia requiring regional review 16 complete sets of maps and supporting documents
For installations in the District of Columbia, Maryland or Virginia not requiring regional review 3 complete sets of maps and supporting documents

E. Electronic Data Submissions

Sponsoring agencies may provide their master plan submissions (maps and narrative) electronically. Agencies are encouraged to contact the staff to coordinate the procedures for electronic submissions.

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Section 5 - Master Plan Coordination and Review Process

The following steps are involved in the coordination and review of a master plan prior to and during its preparation by a sponsoring agency and following its submission to the Commission.

A. Informal consultation with the Commission staff.

An informal consultation session with the Commission staff should be held by a sponsoring agency prior to initiating the preparation of a proposed master plan or a significant modification to an existing master plan.
At such a session, a joint determination will be made as to whether there are any unique or special characteristics of the affected installation which necessitate modification of any requirements respecting the master plan submission. A joint determination will also be made as to whether, because of special characteristics of an installation or proposed developments to be accommodated by a master plan, there is a need for a presentation of any type to the Commission prior to the preparation and submission of the master plan. The session will also be used to plan for early consultation with other organizations as part of the intergovernmental review process.

B. Early consultation and discussion of proposed master plan with other affected government agencies.

After it has been contacted by a sponsoring Federal agency concerning the initiation of planning for an installation in the region, the Commission, as appropriate, will contact the planning agency, intergovernmental review official, chief administrative officer, and responsible elected official of the affected local government(s) and the affected area and state clearinghouse(s) about the work involved and the anticipated schedule for submission of the proposed master plan or revised master plan to the Commission. Where appropriate, the Commission will arrange a meeting of concerned agencies and officials with the agency sponsoring the master planning work to discuss that work, prior to any submission to the Commission.
The purpose of this step is to give local, regional, and state agencies an opportunity to learn about proposed Federal plans being developed in the region and permit early identification of possible questions, issues and concerns. This step in the process has been established in accordance with the Commission's "Procedures for Intergovernmental Cooperation in Federal Planning in the National Capital Region." Although this step applies as a requirement only to sponsoring Federal agencies, the Commission will, upon request of an affected District of Columbia agency preparing a master plan for an installation outside the District of Columbia within the region, arrange similar early consultation with the affected local, regional, and state agencies and officials.

C. Determination of appropriate environmental document for the proposed master plan.

Master plan submissions must include appropriate environmental documentation, pursuant to Section 3.A.2. of these requirements and the Commission's Environmental Policies and Procedures.
The sponsoring agency should consult with the Commission at the earliest possible time in its master planning to determine whether projects covered by the master plan will require Commission approval thereby requiring Commission participation with the sponsoring agency in determining the appropriate environmental document for the master plan.

The environmental determination of the sponsoring agency must be made, and the environmental document submitted, in accordance with the Commission's Environmental Policies and Procedures. The required consultation regarding environmental documentation may occur in the initial informal consultation by the sponsoring agency with the Commission staff.

D. Submission of the proposed master plan to the Commission for review and action

The sponsoring agency shall submit the master plan in accordance with established monthly deadlines, which are available from the Commission.

E. Commission initiation of procedures for compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended, if applicable.

Master plan submissions must include a historic preservation report, pursuant to Section 3.A.l.l. of these requirements. If Section 106 of the Act is applicable, the sponsoring agency shall complete compliance therewith prior to Commission action.
Upon receipt of a master plan submission from the District of Columbia Government for one of its installations within the central area of the District of Columbia, the Executive Director of the Commission will determine whether the master plan is subject to the provisions of Section 106. If he so determines, the Executive Director will initiate procedures for compliance. Compliance will be completed prior to Commission action on the proposed master plan.

F. Referral where appropriate, of the proposed master plan to the responsible local, regional, and state agencies.

Upon receipt of a master plan, the Commission will refer the plan to the affected local planning agency and regional and state clearinghouse for review and comment. The master plan will in turn also be referred by the regional clearinghouse (the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments) to the designated intergovernmental review official of the affected jurisdiction for review and comment.

G. Resolution of planning issues, if any, between local and Federal agencies

Upon the identification of planning issues raised by a proposed master plan, the Commission staff in conjunction with the staff of the Council of Governments, will work with the affected local, regional or state agencies and the Federal agency to resolve such issues in accordance with "Procedures for Resolving Planning Issues That May Arise Between Local and Federal Agencies in the National Capital Region" adopted by the Commission on November 18, 1982, and the Commission's Procedures for Intergovernmental Cooperation in Federal Planning in the National Capital Region.

H. Referral, where appropriate, of the proposed master plan to the Commission's Coordinating Committee

Upon receipt of a master plan for a Federal or District of Columbia installation in the District of Columbia, the Commission will refer the master plan to its Coordinating Committee, pursuant to Section 2(d) of the Planning Act, for review and coordination.
The committee is composed of representatives of Federal and District of Columbia agencies involved in planning and development activities. The master plan will also be referred to the Council of Governments and the designated intergovernmental review official of the District of Columbia.

I. Review and preparation of recommendations by the Commission staff.


Following the receipt of comments from other organizations and the Coordinating Committee, where appropriate, the staff will prepare recommendations for action by the Commission on the master plan. The staff recommendations will be provided to the Commission and made available to the sponsoring agency and the general public approximately one week in advance of the scheduled Commission review and action on the plan.

J. Notification to the public and public participation in Commission review.

In accordance with the Commission's "Revised Procedures for Public Participation", organizations in the vicinity of an installation will receive a notice titled "Tentative Agenda Items" indicating the tentative schedule for the Commission's review of a master plan submission. Organizations or individuals may submit written comments for consideration by the Executive Director of the Commission in the preparation of staff recommendations. In addition, organizations or individuals may appear before the Commission to comment on a master plan submission and/or to comment on the Commission staff's recommendations on the submission.

K. Review and action by the Commission.

The Commission will review the master plan submission at a scheduled meeting. The sponsoring agency will be notified by the staff of the schedule for Commission review, and the staff will coordinate with the agency concerning a presentation of the submission to the Commission.

L. Official notification of Commission action on the master plan.

Notification of the Commission action on the master plan will be provided by letter to the sponsoring agency immediately following such action

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Section 6 - Time Period for Review

Master plans for installations for which a referral to local, regional, and state agencies is required will be subject to a review period of approximately 90 days, whenever possible, 60 days of which will be devoted to review by the agencies receiving the referral. A sponsoring agency may request a reduction of 30 days of this review period from the Executive Director of the Commission if special and unusual circumstances warrant, but every effort should be made to comply with the 90-day review.

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Section 7 - Presubmission Requirements

As noted in Section 5.A. at the time of initial informal consultation on the proposed preparation of a master plan, the sponsoring agency and Commission staff will determine whether, because of special characteristics of an installation or the developments being considered for that installation, there is a need for any type of presentation to the Commission prior to the preparation and submission of the master plan. In some cases a presentation for information purposes may be appropriate to provide an opportunity for the Commission to become familiar at an early stage with an evolving development proposal.

In other cases, the submission of site boundaries, a development program, and development concepts may be required to obtain Commission views and action on an acquisition proposal pursuant to Section 5 (a) of the Planning Act prior to the expenditure of funds for the preparation of a master plan. Where land is already under the jurisdiction of the sponsoring agency, the submission of development concepts to obtain Commission views on a particular proposal in advance of the preparation of a master plan may also be appropriate under certain circumstances. In cases where a presubmission of some form or a presentation is determined to be required or warranted, the contents will be determined through consultation by the sponsoring agency with the Commission staff.

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Section 8 - Amendments or Modifications to Master Plans

The process outlined above also applies to proposed modifications or revisions to master plans that have been previously approved by the Commission. Once a master plan has been approved, regional review of subsequent proposed modifications or revisions will be required only where the Executive Director of the Commission, in consultation with the sponsoring agency and affected local jurisdiction(s), determines that:
  1. a major change in the character or intensity of an existing use is proposed, or

  2. the proposed modifications or revisions would significantly change the off-site impact of the Federal activities and uses carried out within the site.
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Section 9 - Review and Updating of Master Plans

Agencies are encouraged to review master plans on a periodic basis to insure that both inventory material and development proposals are current. Such reviews should be conducted at least every five years. Sponsoring agencies should advise the Commission of the results of such reviews and provide to the Commission proposed schedules for the updating of master plans on a five-year cycle when updating is determined to be needed.1. " Region" or "National Capital Region" means the District of Columbia; Montgomery and Prince George's Counties in Maryland; Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William Counties in Virginia; and all cities now or hereafter existing in Maryland or Virginia within the geographic area bounded by the outer boundaries.
2. The "Central Area" of the District of Columbia as currently defined is that area contained within the boundaries of the Downtown and Shaw School Urban Renewal Areas.

(Approved September 6, 1984 and amended November 7, 1985 and October 27, 1994)

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